Recent News


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Apr 20, 2018

How are the bacteria in our guts related to each other? New technique provides insight.

Researchers at the University of California Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) have validated a new method for use in microbiome studies that could help detect subtle changes in the composition of a microbial community and provide insight into the evolutionary history of community members. The method is more sensitive than current technologies, and could revolutionize the way microbiome data is analyzed. The findings are published April 17 in mSystems.


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Apr 2, 2018

Virus Found to Adapt through Newly Discovered Path of Evolution.

Bucking a central tenet of biology, researchers at the University of California San Diego and their colleagues have discovered evidence for a new path of evolution, and with it a deeper understanding of how quickly organisms such as viruses can adapt to their environment.


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Mar 22, 2018

New workflow revolutionizes the discovery of candidate drugs from nature.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation have developed a new workflow to accelerate the discovery of drug candidate molecules present in nature. The method fills a gap in the current process and cuts down on the amount of time it takes to identify candidate drug molecules. A paper describing the method was published recently in Journal of Natural Products.


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Mar 15, 2018

Combining Microbial and Chemical Fingerprints for Forensics Applications.

Researchers at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and Center for Microbiome Innovation have for the first time combined technologies that detect the presence of microbes and chemicals to identify “who touched what” in a manmade space. The new method fills a gap in current forensic technologies, and could have a variety of applications, including criminal profiling and environmental exposure studies. The studywas published recently in Scientific Reports.


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Mar 13, 2018

UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation Announces Panasas as Corporate Member.

The UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) announces that Panasas, a leading provider of performance scale-out network-attached storage, has joined CMI’s Corporate Member Board and has donated a 500TB Panasas ActiveStor® high-performance storage solution to support the acceleration of microbiome research. ActiveStor drives productivity and accelerates time to results with ultrafast streaming performance, true linear scalability, enterprise-grade reliability and unparalleled ease of management.


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Mar 6, 2018

Unlocking a Resource: Urine-eating bacteria have existed for millions of years in the guts of ants.

In a new, collaborative study, researchers at the University of California San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) and colleagues across the nation have discovered the mechanism by which a canopy-dwelling herbivorous ant acquires the nitrogen it needs to synthesize essential amino acids: by way of the urine-eating bacteria that took up residence in its gut 46 million years ago. The findings are published in the March 6 issue of Nature Communications, and provide insight into agricultural insect management.


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Mar 1, 2018

A Campus Hub for Data Science.

The cross-disciplinary Halıcıoğlu Data Science Institute, or HDSI, will become the campus hub for data science. It will help train students in the latest data-science techniques and transform the research of scholars who are now increasingly limited in making progress in their disciplines because of the need to make sense of the massive amounts of data generated from their research.


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Feb 27, 2018

New online tool gives 3D view of human metabolic processes.

A new computational resource called Recon3D provides a 3D view of genes, proteins and metabolites involved in human metabolism. Researchers used the tool to map disease-related mutations on proteins and also probed how genes and proteins change in response to certain drugs. The work provides a better understanding of disease-causing mutations and could enable researchers to discover new uses for existing drug treatments.


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Feb 22, 2018

How Bacteria Steal Antibiotic-Resistant Genes.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation have identified the mechanism by which a clinically relevant bacterium may gain antibiotic resistance, and have come up with a model for predicting the conditions under which it spreads. The findings, which establish a framework for understanding, quantifying and hopefully combating the emergence of superbugs, were published in a recent paper in eLife.


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Feb 21, 2018

Xiltrix joins the affiliate program at the UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation.

XiltriX, a service that provides data acquisition, analysis, reporting and documentation for compliance and validation, has joined the UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) as an industry affiliate. XiltriX measures lab equipment, such as fridges, freezers and other vital equipment to ensure that it is functioning properly, across campus, and in real-time.


Events


 Pinned

Feb 27, 2019

Save‑the‑date: 2019 CMI International Microbiome Conference

Please save the dates for the CMI 2019International Conference, taking place February 27-28, 2019 at the Scripps Seaside Forum, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Building on the success of the California CMI meeting, we are expanding our reach globally to share the latest in microbiome research. The first edition will be marked by an allstar line-up of exclusively women speakers, including speakers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.


May 2, 2018

20th Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Meeting

CMI is helping host the 20th Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Meeting May 2-4, 2018. The mission of the GSC is to work towards making genomic data discoverable and enabling genomic data integration, discovery and comparison through international community-driven standards. This 3-day meeting will highlight the nexus of genomic standards, microbiomes and advances in metabolomics, immunome and taxonomy.

The all-star lineup of speakers includes:

  • Rita Colwell—2006 Medal of Science recipient
  • Julie Robinson, NASA Chief Scientist, International Space Station
  • Rodney Brister, Staff Scientist, NCBI Viral Genomes Resource
  • Claire O’Donovan, Head of Metabolomics, EMBL-EBI
  • and more...

Hurry! Registration closes April 1st.

When: May 2-4, 2018

Where: Atkinson Hall, UC San Diego

General Registration: $400 (Student Registration: $200)


Press Coverage


Apr 3, 2018
Yahoo! News

A new stomach wearable could replace invasive tests

Researchers have a created a wearable device for the stomach that can be used to monitor digestive activity and help spot potential issues. A team of scientists from the University of California San Diego have built a small 3D-printed box, complete with 10 small electrodes that also attach to the abdomen and can be used to monitor electrical activity in the stomach. The researchers said the early results from testing show it to perform as well as tests carried out in a clinical setting, and because it comes with an app and can be linked with a smartphone,


Apr 2, 2018
engadget

stomach wearable could replace the need for invasive probes

Researchers have created a wearable monitor that can track your stomach's electrical activity for signs of digestion maladies. Called electrogastrography (EGG), it's like an EEG for the GI tract, and was used briefly in the '90s but abandoned due to a lack of usefulness as a diagnostic tool. UCSD scientists are trying to resuscitate it with improved hardware and, most importantly, algorithms that help filter out noise. The results so far are promising, and if perfected, it could help doctors diagnose gastro-intestinal problems without the need for invasive probes or even a hospital visit.


Apr 2, 2018
engadget

Stomach wearable could replace the need for invasive probes

Researchers have created a wearable monitor that can track your stomach's electrical activity for signs of digestion maladies. Called electrogastrography (EGG), it's like an EEG for the GI tract, and was used briefly in the '90s but abandoned due to a lack of usefulness as a diagnostic tool. UCSD scientists are trying to resuscitate it with improved hardware and, most importantly, algorithms that help filter out noise. The results so far are promising, and if perfected, it could help doctors diagnose gastro-intestinal problems without the need for invasive probes or even a hospital visit.

Contacts for the News Media

Deborah L. Bright

Communications Officer
Email: dlbright@ucsd.edu
Phone: +1 (858) 534-8390

Jacobs School of Engineering Newsroom

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